Determinants of post-training attrition in the Army and Air Force
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Determinants of post-training attrition in the Army and Air Force

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Published by Rand Corp. in Santa Monica, Calif .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • United States. Army -- Recruiting, enlistment, etc.,
  • United States. Air Force -- Recruiting, enlistment, etc.,
  • United States. Army -- Personnel management.,
  • United States. Air Force -- Personnel management.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementRichard Buddin.
SeriesThe Rand paper series ;, P-6709, P (Rand Corporation) ;, P-6709.
ContributionsRand Corporation.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsAS36 .R28 no. 6709, UB323 .R28 no. 6709
The Physical Object
Pagination39 p. ;
Number of Pages39
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3082480M
LC Control Number82183263

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Develops a multivariate model describing the effects of individual background characteristics, duty location assignments, career turbulence, and military occupational assignments on post-training enlisted male attrition in the Army and Air Force. The research suggests that military occupation and duty location are significantly correlated with post-training attrition, after controlling for individual Author: Richard Buddin. Determinants of Post-Training Attrition in the Army and Air Force. Buddin, Richard A study was conducted to identify the separate influences of individual background characteristics and service environment on post-training attrition in the Army and Air : Richard Buddin. '*Air ForCe; *4rmy. ABSTRACT. A study was conducted to identify the separate influences of individual background characteristics and. service. envirOnment on post-training attrition in the Army and Air Force..A,second objective of the study was to determine whether the. correlates. of post-training attrition vary across services and military. Get this from a library! The role of service experience in post-training attrition in the Army and Air Force: prepared for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Manpower, Reserve Affairs, and Logistics). [Richard J Buddin; United States. Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Manpower, Reserve Affairs, and Logistics); Rand Corporation.].

military, that of attrition. If this problem continues, the future will look suspect in the force mix we put together for the next Peacekeeping Force or Task Force or mission that falls within our National Security Plan. Attrition must be reviewed to determine where we are and where we. Military turnover involving air force staff is a unique and rare phenomenon. Eyebrows were therefore raised when it was observed that there were hundreds of aircraft technicians who were ex.   REFERENCES BUDDIN, R. (). The role of service experience in post-training attrition in the Army and Air Force. GOODSTADT, B. E., MALLAMAD, S., & MERRIN, M. B. (). Research on determinants of unit-level attrition impacts: Quantitative analysis of attrition impacts. R. BuddinThe role of service experience in post-training.   WASHINGTON (Army News Service, J ) -- To become a "force of the future," the Army must slow down the movement of officers and .

This paper provides a brief historical overview of air traffic controller (ATC) selection, reviews current U.S. Air Force (USAF) selection procedures for enlisted ATC trainees, and summarizes the. Air Force Air Force basic training occurs at one site: Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Tex. Re-cruits complete a day curriculum, which is spread over 6 weeks. Before training starts, recruits spend an average of 2 days on administrative inprocessing. They live in open-bay dormitories that routinely house 55 to 58 recruits (a maximum. Yes, it is possible to fail basic training. You could go through the trouble of leaving your home, job, family and friends and come back a failure. In fact, this happens to about 15 percent of. the Regular Army, the Army National Guard/Army National Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve, unless otherwise stated, and is compliant with Army Total Force Policy. It also applies to Department of the Army Civilian employ-ees. During mobilization, .